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  December 2009
volume 7 number 3
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  Suzanne Frost
  Kristine Ong Muslim
  A.J. Odasso
  Nydia Rojas
  Paul Kareem Tayyar
  Florence Weinberger
 
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Kristine Ong Muslim December 2009
   

 

bio


art by leigh white

    Kristine Ong Muslim's work has appeared or is forthcoming in more than three hundred publications worldwide, including Arch Literary Journal, Beeswax Magazine, Ducts, Gander Press Review, GlassFire Magazine, Grasslimb, Narrative Magazine, Pearl Magazine, The Pedestal Magazine, and Weave Magazine. She was nominated thrice for the Pushcart Prize.

   

 

The Smallest Hollow

    This was the day you get used to eating on the floor. The crumbs, well, they just fell from your mouth, not hoping to grow back into that familiar shape of a bread. You must think that the world is going to end, yet by noon, the streets are still filled with people. Loneliness, that conspicuous sinkhole in the middle of the crowd, waves at you. You still feel that you wanted more, more pain, more hunger, more things to do and undo..

    The bus honks. It is your cue to linger until it is your time to shine, to die, little by little until you realize that you have been happy all along, that you have always been fine, that you have become oblivious to the fact that you are already reading aloud, the words sounding more familiar than before.

copyright 2009 Kristine Ong Muslim

   

 

A Blind Item From a Local Tabloid

    College boys from a nearby state university stole a tombstone, exhumed the inevitable. They did not understand that it was a waste to recycle the bones of dead relatives. They could have swirled wine from fermented cemetery grass, could have used a specific jar for that, a specific lid to that jar of yellow-green darkness, could have scooped water from a pond where twenty-five frogs frog-hopped in parallel trajectories so that their paths (the frogs) would not collide.


(first appeared in Slurve Magazine #2, Jan 2008)

copyright 2009 Kristine Ong Muslim